It was around 2010; a few years into being a patineur that I began to think of myself as more than just an art finisher, but as an artist in my own right.

My fascination with science and how its chemicals can radically change the surface of bronze inspired me to experiment, operating on the fringes of where these two worlds meet, and hone my skills as a private patineur.

My childhood affinity for kinetics and invention has led me to pursue non-traditional approaches in my art. 

I am currently working on a brand new series of works that showcase patination in all its glory. Working with identical shapes allows me to explore every patination process in the book, so to speak. Hot, cold, buried, fumed, cold immersion, hot immersion, boiling immerion, and wrapping techniques; processes largely unexplored due to the impractical nature of large bronzes. 

My current direction has a strong interactive component, abolishing the notion of a completed artwork.

Ive found a way to merge 3 mediums into 1. Bronze sculpture, without the 3rd dimention. Painting without the delicate nature of paint to canvass. Photography without the permanent passage of light travel.

COPPER-PLATE – colour palette

COPPER-PLATE – stencil technique

TITLE:    DANIEL AND THE LION

YEAR:    2015

ARTIST:    JOSÉ VENTURA

MEDIUM:    PATINA ON COPPER-PLATE

SIZE:    70 x 55cm

DESCRIPTION:    a rendition of Gian Lorenzo Bernini’s sculpture

COPPER-PLATE – appressed technique

TITLE:    APRESSION

YEAR:    2015

ARTIST:    JOSÉ VENTURA

MEDIUM:    PATINA ON COPPER-PLATE

SIZE:    70 x 55cm

DESCRIPTION:    SKIN APRESSED TO CLEAN COPPER-PLATE AND FUME PATINATED

CLOTH SCULPTURES – draped technique

TITLE:    TRANSCEND

YEAR:    2012

ARTIST:    JOSÉ VENTURA

MEDIUM:    HARDENED CLOTH

SIZE:    90 x 65cm

DESCRIPTION:    CLOTH HARDENED OVER UPPER BODY

COLABORATION with LIONEL SMIT – fume patina technique

TITLE:    PATINASCAPE

YEAR:    2012

ARTIST:    JOSÉ VENTURA & LIONEL SMIT

MEDIUM:    PATINA ON BRONZE & COPPER-PLATE

SIZE:    35 x 60cm

DESCRIPTION:    FRAGMENT BRONZE ON COPPER-PLATE – FUME PATINATED

FLAME PHOTOGRAPHY – long exposure

TITLE:    TRANS-FIGURE HIGH KEY

YEAR:    2009

ARTIST:    JOSÉ VENTURA

SCULPTOR:    DYLAN LEWIS

MEDIUM:    PHOTO

SIZE:    60 x 42cm

DESCRIPTION:    LONG EXPOSURE PHOTOGRAPHY OF PATINA PROCESS

FUTURE DIRECTION……………

(a merging of art and invention)

KINETIC & MOVEMENT

I got to thinking that art can be a representation of life, and life without movement is dead. Being fascinated with movement and how it can connect with music, I became interested in art that was less static and more life-like, art that could move. Having created static copper plates in the past, I wanted to push that boundary. Something I also have a passion for is partner-dance – salsa, bachata and kizomba. I then thought of adding movement to the plates, and the more I thought about it, the more I would think of the engineering behind the plates that were necessary to facilitate movement.

Mechanical

I began to think of a flat panel surface as individual facets. If each facet could move on its own axis, then interesting things could begin to happen. The only this was…HOW?
Starting out, I had to hire someone to do a 3d drawing on the computer of what was in my mind. Sending that to the 3d printer, I was able to print a housing for bearings which held  bearings, a shaft and in turn, a facet.
I was also able to send my rudimentary drawings to suppliers to cut into copper, and upon receiving all parts – to assemble.
Upon assembly, I saw that the movement was somewhat limited. I was to search for greater freedom of movement, yet I was happy that I achieved getting 21 panels to move in synchronisation. What dawned on my next would dictate a direction that I still employ to this day, magnetism.

Magnetic

With the interconnected shafts between panels, freedom of movement was non-existent, each panel would move in unison with the next, without any room for individuality. And so the shafts would be fitted with holsters which would house magnets, set at differing angles. This is where I learnt to draw on the pc, since many 3d printed holsters would need to be made.
Having created housing for bearings (which facilitate movement of the panels), I wanted to further invent a way that allowed for a greater scope of movement than just the see-saw action of the bearing, into a gyroscopic-like range.
This desire to invent new ways of utilising magnets in conjunction with shafts and bearings would lead me to exploration even until this day.

Electric

Seeing the potential of movement and its effect on light and perspective, I went further and designed a way for servo motors to facilitate movement on 1 facet, which had a knock-on effect on the rest of the facet, causing them to to move as-well.

LIGHT & REFLECTION

I’m not here to create more stuff, we have enough objects in this world already, and I’ve always had to make do with what I got. This has taught me to find ways that harness what is already around me, to leverage thought and see versatility – especially with regards to sunlight, which I have begun to see as my mediumshaping it and creating images in ways that astound. Since reflection has much to do with perspective – everyone; to their own viewpoint, different images emerge – all dependant on 3 factors: source of light, angle of facet and point of view. As these 3 variables shift, and so do the images.

Abstract

Having experimented with moving facets and its kinetic aspect, I began to notice that as the facets would shift, incoming light was either reflected or not, resulting in the factes appearing either bright or dark; causing me to think of these facets as pixels in an image. As the facets/pixels would move, plays of light on the surface too would result, creating abstract patterns. These patterns would be dictated by the unseen kinetic configuration assembly just behind the facets that facilitate movement.

Cognitive

If left unconfigured, the shapes/patterns would be abstract and random. Yet if the kinetic mechanism was choreographed, distinct shapes / patterns would emerge from interacting with the incoming light. It dawned on me that patterns could be grouped together to represent images, such as those you would recognise. It would all depend on the angle of the incoming light, the angle of the facets, the range of motion of the facets along with the perspective of the viewer – culminating into a multidisciplinary artwork, where the image was only a byproduct of the art and its relation with light, but not inherit therin.

Interactive

We need more art that requires audience participation, art that can change depending on who is there and the thoughts that persons bring with them, art that is interactive. Utilizing the moving mechanisms along with the disciplines that allow this, Ive developed a way that invites audience participation, so that the artwork can remain everchanging, representing the ideas and virtues of those present. 

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